All images courtesy of the artists. UGO 0.2 Project Space | ELBLOK Publications. 

Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This |

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Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This | Olivia Bax - Handle This |

Handle This

GIF & monoprint

2019

Olivia Bax

 

In the studio, making work involves a series of actions: some planned, some responsive. Handle This is a recording of a simple action, one of many to complete a sculpture. In this .gif I was preparing the surface of a part of a sculpture in preparation for a ready-made handle. 

 

Making my sculpture is physical. Most of my stimulus comes in the studio when I am actively making work. I use technology (my phone) as a way of recording work in progress so I can still think and refer to the studio when I cannot physically be there. When I was asked to make a .gif, something I have never done before, I wanted to record something myself, with my phone and no other assistance. Making sculpture is a constant negotiation with oneself – what can I lift, how can I reach, what space do I have, how can it stand, what materials do I have? It was important that I made the .gif myself in order to be representational of my normal studio practice. So I recorded various actions by taking a series of still images, worked out how to put them together and selected the best sequence. 

 

I have been using handles for some time. The surface of my work often records the marks from my hands. The marks are not arbitrary but show the way in which the material has been pressed, smeared and covered on to the armature of the sculpture. The use of handles is a playful tease to the viewer but also another reassertion of the hand in an already loaded hand-made work.  

 

The .gif is not smooth or crisp. It has a roughness like the texture of my work. When I had worked out how to change the speeds of the still images I realised that the movement was representative of the different speeds of making. By slowing frames down, and speeding others up, I thought about how one labours and thinks about work for a long period of time, normally for a quick crescendo at the end. The loop acts as an important tool to see that the changes in speed are not an error in the file but deliberate. In the studio, things might slow down, and speed up again but an artist’s work never stops…

Olivia Bax 2019

Commissioned by UGO 0.2 | Colchester School of Art